Anti-Semitism is a sin

by 1389 on December 6, 2012

in 1389 (blog admin), anti-Semitism, mob violence, Orthodox Christianity, pogroms, Russia, Ukraine

Ryan P. Hunter: Anti-Jewish sentiment in Christian history and Europe today

A shameful part of early and modern European history, Christianity was historically used to justify antisemitic sentiment and violence.

While there is nothing intrinsically anti-Semitic in Orthodox Christianity or any other Christian communion, I have encountered a surprising and disturbing number of professed Christians over the years who have expressed that they have a strong dislike for Jews. Growing up with many Jewish friends in a very religiously diverse area of Long Island, New York, I have also known many Jews who have developed a very negative opinion of Christianity in general because of their encounter with either 1) the historical reality that many Christian people and rulers throughout history have been responsible for hateful actions, even murder, against Jews, or 2) a Christian person living today who holds anti-Semitic views.
[…]
One Russian bishop who followed in Metropolitan Anthony’s footsteps, whom I never had the pleasure of meeting, was the late Bishop Basil (Rodzianko). He was my godmother’s spiritual father, and, according to her, he often told his parishioners and spiritual children that it is a grave sin to ever hold or act upon an anti-Jewish view or impulse, since Christ Himself, the Mother of God, all the apostles, etc, belonged by blood to the house of Israel. Bishop Basil reposed in 1999, so this shows that the phenomenon of Russian Orthodox hierarchs opposing anti-Jewish sentiment continues.

Read the rest.

Ryan P. Hunter: Abbot Tryphon shares Metropolitan Anthony’s sermon reacting to Kishenev pogrom

SCAPEGOATING THE JEWS

His Eminence Metropolitan Anthony (Khrapovitsky) of Kiev and Galicia (1863-1936) was one of the most famous 20th century hierarchs of the Russian Orthodox Church. A renowned author and theologian, in 1918 he received the majority of votes for the restored office of Patriarch of Moscow, but the future confessor and martyr Patriarch Tikhon was to be enthroned instead. Fleeing in 1918 from the advancement of the Bolsheviks as large numbers of his fellow bishops were being executed, Metropolitan Anthony was charged by Patriarch Tikhon with leading the Russian Church in exile.

With all the horrific conspiracy theories regarding 911, the banking industry, and the takeover of our American government by Jews, it is time, I believe, to read the words of this holy hierarch, an address made to a mob following a murderous pogrom against the Jews in Kiev. We should take to heart these words of Metropolitan Anthony for this present age, for the economic crisis, together with the mass unemployment stats, as our world is in the same dangerous state that was found in Germany, just prior to the rise of Adolf Hitler. Never again can any of us sit by in silence, and allow any people to be scapegoated for the sins of all.
Love in Christ,
Abbot Tryphon

Abbot TryphonThe Very Reverend Igumen Abbot Tryphon is the spiritual leader at All Merciful Saviour monastery located on Vashon Island in Puget Sound near Seattle, Washington State. The monastery is within the canonical jurisdiction of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia. The monastery’s widely acclaimed and popular Facebook page can be found here. Abbot Tryphon’s popular blog can be accessed here.

Ryan P. Hunter’s comments:

Metropolitan Anthony delivered this sermon in the Cathedral of Zhytomyr (in west-central Ukraine today) following the 1903 Easter pogrom in Kishenev (today Chișinău, Moldavia) against local Jews. This murderous pogrom, one of the most violent during this period, caused major debate within the Russian Empire, with prominent members of the intelligentsia such as Tolstoy giving the subject of pogroms significant attention for the first time.

Additionally, the Kishenev pogrom caused an international outcry, with U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt summoning the Russian ambassador Count Cassini to explain why Tsarist officials did not intervene to protect the local Jews. American Jews collecting thousands of signatures from Jews and Gentiles alike in a petition to Tsar Nicholas II which he ultimately rejected. Few of the perpetrators were punished for their crimes, ranging from theft to violent assault to cold-blooded murder, and this was one of the reasons why so many Russian and Ukrainian Jews immigrated soon after to the United States and Britain.

An additional source with the entire known transcript of the sermon can be found here.

Read the rest.

SERMON AGAINST THE POGROMS

Blessed Antony Khrapovitsky, Metropolitan of Kiev, Cathedral of Zhitomir April 20, 1903
Read it all HERE.


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