Iranian ayatollahs seek to destroy Persepolis and the tomb of Cyrus

by JennSierra on January 15, 2008

in Iran, Islam, Israel, Jenn Sierra, Taliban

By Jenn Sierra

According to Ran Porat, of Omedia:

persepolis5.gif

…[T]he ayatollah regime in Iran is endeavoring to sever the link between the Persian people and its historic heritage through measures including the destruction of archaeological sites that are significant to this heritage.

The Iranian government is in the final stages of constructing a dam in the country’s south that will submerge the archaeological sites of Pasargad and Persepolis – the ancient capital of the Persian Empire. The site, which is considered exceptional in terms of its archaeological wealth and historical importance, houses the tomb of the Persian King Cyrus. It was Cyrus who liberated Babylonian Jewry from their exile in the famous Declaration of Cyrus…

Ezra HaLevi of IsraelNationalNews.com points out:

The Iranian ayatollahs are planning on destroying the tomb as part of a general campaign to sever the Persian people from their non-Islamic heritage; Cyrus was thought to be a Zoroastrian and was one of the first rulers to enforce a policy of religious tolerance on his huge kingdom.

[…]

pasargadae_tomb_cyrus_1.jpgThough the city of Pasargad is a ruin, Cyrus’s Tomb has remained largely intact and it has been partially restored to counter its natural deterioration over the years.

Cyrus was praised in the Tanach (Isaiah 45:1-6), though he was also criticized for believing the false report of the Cuthites, who wanted to halt the building of the Second Temple. They accused the Jews of conspiring to rebel, so Cyrus in turn stopped the construction of the temple, which would not be completed until 516 BCE, during the reign of Darius the Great, the grandson of Queen Esther.

1389, who forwarded this information to me, added:

Reminds me of the Taliban’s destruction of those Buddha statues at Bamiyan.

To find out about a movement to stop this shameful destruction of historical artifacts, visit the Pasargad Heritage Foundation.

 

(Also at FHK)


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