US Senate arrogates the power to decide who is a journalist and who isn’t – bloggers get no protection

by 1389 on September 13, 2013

in 1389 (blog admin), blogging, mainstream media, U.S. Senate and Congress

The purpose is to protect the hard-left mainstream media and to withdraw protection from independent bloggers who work at their own expense to present an alternative point of view.

ABC: Senate Panel Oks Measure Defining a Journalist

A Senate panel on Thursday approved legislation designed to protect reporters and the news media from having to reveal their confidential sources after narrowing the definition of a journalist and establishing which formats — traditional and online — provide news to people worldwide.

On a 13-5 vote, the Judiciary Committee cleared the way for the full Senate to consider the measure. The vote came just months after the disclosure that the Justice Department had secretly subpoenaed almost two months’ worth of telephone records for 21 phone lines used by reporters and editors for The Associated Press and secretly used a search warrant to obtain some emails of a Fox News journalist.

The Justice Department took the actions in looking into leaks of classified information to the news organizations. The AP received no advance warning of the subpoena.

“One of the things that protect democracy is the free flow of information,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., chairman of the Judiciary Committee, who mentioned his own connection to journalism. Leahy’s parents, Alba and Howard, published a weekly newspaper before selling it and starting a printing business.

Criticism of the collection of the phone records and other material without any notice to the news organizations prompted President Barack Obama to order Attorney General Eric Holder to review the department’s policy. The bill would incorporate many of the changes proposed by Holder in July, including giving advance notice to the news media of a subpoena.

In a July 29 letter to Leahy, Holder said the measure “strikes a careful balance between safeguarding the freedom of the press and ensuring our nation’s security.”

In a broadside against the Obama administration, Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, said the legislation was merely a diversion by the White House. It was introduced three days after word emerged about the secret subpoenas of the AP records.

“A new law is not what we need,” Cornyn said. “We find ourselves here because of the abuses of the attorney general.”

A point of dispute was the definition of a journalist.

The original bill would have extended protections to a “covered person” who investigates events and obtains material to disseminate news and information to the public. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., a chief proponent of the medial shield legislation, worked with Sens. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Dick Durbin, D-Ill., as well as representatives from news organizations, on a compromise.

The protections would apply to “covered journalist,” defined as an employee, independent contractor or agent of an entity that disseminates news or information. The individual would have to have been employed for one year within the last 20 or three months within the last five years.

It would apply to student journalists or someone with a considerable amount of freelance work in the last five years. A federal judge also would have the discretion to declare an individual a “covered journalist,” who would be granted the privileges of the law.

The compromise also says that information is only privileged if it is disseminated by a news medium, described as “newspaper, nonfiction book, wire service, news agency, news website, mobile application or other news or information service (whether distributed digitally or otherwise); news program, magazine or other periodical, whether in print, electronic or other format; or thorough television or radio broadcast … or motion picture for public showing.”

While the definition covers traditional and online media, it draws the line at posts on Twitter, blogs or social media from non-journalists.

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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

1 Gramfan September 13, 2013 at 7:40 pm

Is there nothing they won’t try to shut up the opposition? Rhetorical question!

Good thing Ben Franklin isn’t alive today. “Poor Richard’s Almanac” and all his other pamphlets would never have seen the light of day!

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