Why is Georgia allowing a Turkish settlement?

by 1389 on March 22, 2011

in 1389 (blog admin), Caliphate, Caucasus, George Soros, Islamic infiltration/invasion, railroads and trains, Turkey

Says Philip_Daniel:

Georgia is planning to settle Turks in the Javakhk region?

Have they lost their minds?!

(Point of clarification: we are not speaking of the State of Georgia in the American South, but of the nation of Georgia in the Caucasus.)

I suspect that US influence in Georgia, in the aftermath of the nefarious George Soros-engineered “Rose Revolution” of 2003, is at least partly to blame for this madness. The once-“secular” Turkey is doing everything it can to expand its influence in Asia, and to establish a new de facto caliphate. Turkey’s intentions in funding a railroad in Georgia are anything but benign.

It is ALWAYS wrong to allow Muslims into any non-Muslim country or territory, no matter what the excuse.

Where Javakhk issue is hidden?

(h/t: Philip Daniel)

By Times.am at 5 March, 2011, 5:56 pm
by Ara Khachatouryan,
Asbarez.com

Every day, the Armenians of the Samtskhe-Javakheti (Javakhk) region in Georgia face a harsh battle for survival. Yet through sheer will and determination, the community, which faces discrimination and insurmountable obstacles, is able to keep the Armenian identity alive, not for fear of assimilation but for the most basic of reasons: survival.

In the 20 years since Armenia’s independence and the collapse of the Soviet Union, the plight of the Armenians in Javakhk has not been center stage, simply because the life and death struggle to liberate Karabakh was, and continues to be at the fore, since it is so detrimental for the Armenian nation.

No one knows that better that the Armenians living in Javakhk, where vestiges of the Soviet regime are still very much part and parcel of daily life. Despite the unique position Georgia enjoys as a darling of the West, enough to prompt a Western-backed and orchestrated color revolution, official Tbilisi has not been willing to enact reforms and, through its arcane laws, discriminates against minorities living in Georgia by blocking their ability to enjoy basic and fundamental rights of practicing their religion and speaking their language. Armenians in Javakhk, who have lived there for centuries before being annexed to Georgia by Joseph Stalin, are being systematically persecuted and their right to life and liberty is being hampered on a daily basis.

This second-class citizen status is impeding Armenians from getting jobs, being represented in local and federal government structures and from teaching Armenian in schools. Furthermore, a state-sponsored campaign to crack down on the community has intensified, resulting in the arrest and incarceration of community activist and leaders on trumped up charges that often border on absurdity.
[…]
Their demands from the Georgian authorities are to not impede the teaching of the Armenian language through state-sanctioned obstacles, which generally are manifested through financial cuts to Armenian schools or the restriction on teaching of history and religion. Another important stipulation is fair representation in local and federal elected offices and equal opportunity for employment. An end to random raids of community facilities and arrest of leaders is also of utmost importance in their demand for human rights. The people of Javakhk are convinced that the most logical way to realize their objectives and address the inequities of the current situation is through autonomy for Javakhk within a federated state of Georgia.
[…]
The challenges facing Armenia, Karabakh and the entire Armenian nation are compounded by the realities facing the Armenians of Javakhk. Aside from Georgian government’s ill-treatment of Armenians, the construction of the Kars-Akhalkalak-Baku railway—almost entirely funded by Turkey and Azerbaijan—coupled with the planned settlement of Meskheti Turks in Javakhk proper threaten the very existence of this historic Armenian territory. [emphasis added]
[…]
Read the rest.


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